Bike Check A former resident of the pro triathlon circuit, Scott chose the Alize for its two-birds-with-one-stone versatility.

Published on May 6th, 2014 | by Kevin

Art’s Cyclery Employee Bike Check

Art’s Employee: Scott Smith
Position: Head Honcho
Bike: Neilpryde Alize

About the Dude: Scott Smith has been co-owner of Art’s Cyclery since 2002, but before then, Scott did a stint as a professional triathlete, where he did his damndest to make speedos look cool. Nowadays, he spends a bit more time on singletrack and much less in speedos (we hope, at least), but the absence of both a road bike and TT bike in his stable left him yearning for a skinny-tired steed that could pull double duty as both a road bike and a time trial machine. Enter the Neilpryde Alize stage left.

Given the brand’s 30-year history in the realm of windsurfing,  Neilpryde was an obvious frame choice for Scott, an avid windsurfer himself.

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While he may have let his pro card expire, Scott still knows how to drop the hammer.

About the Build: Imparting his Alize with healthy dose of split personality disorder, Scott has two builds for his Alize, enabling him to switch between a TT setup and a standard road setup. A quick cockpit change and seatpost swap and Scott can toggle between cheating the wind from the drops in a group ride, or in aero position at a local triathlon.

Either way, the Alize (now called the Nazare, thanks to a cease-and-decist letter from Specialized’s particularly zealous lawyers) is quite talented at making itself scarce where wind is concerned. While the brand’s highly sought after windsurfing sails are great at harnessing the wind, the Alize is quite adept at slipping right past it. Partnering with BMW Designworks USA—the same folks responsible for the bobsled design that carried the U.S. to bronze for the first time in 60 years at the Sochi Olympics, Neilpryde pooled their collective expertise on computational fluid design analysis, fine-tuning  their own tube-profiling techniques to manage airflow through a wide range of wind yaw angles.

What this all adds up to, is a frame that is slippery no matter which way the San Luis Obispo winds hit Scott on any particular day.

Tech Specs:

Frame: Neilpryde Alize – C6.7 Toray unidirectional carbon monocoque
Fork: Neilpryde
Headset: Neilpryde
Wheels: Mavic Ksyrium SLS / HED Jet 6 +
Brakes: Shimano Dura Ace 9000
Crankset: Shimano Dura Ace 9000 50/34
Cassette: Shimano Dura Ace 9000 11-25
Chain: Shimano Dura Ace 9000
Bottom Bracket: PressFit 30
Shift Levers: Shimano Dura Ace 9000 / Dura Ace 9000 Bar End Shifters
Front Derailleur: Shimano Dura Ace 9000
Rear Derailleur: Shimano Dura Ace 9000
Seatpost: Neilpryde Aeroblade full-carbon
Saddle: Specialized S-Works Toupe / Specialized Sitero Gel Expert
Stem: Neilpryde Matrix / Syntace Flat Force
Handlebars: Neilpryde CF Matrix / 3T Aura Pro
Tires: Mavic Yksion Pro Griplink Front, Yksion Pro Powerlink Rear / Continental GP4000S II
Pedals: Speedplay Zero Stainless
Grips: Cinelli Cork Handlebar Tape

Extras: Garmin Edge 500, Forward-offset Aeroblade seatpost

Weight: 15.4 pounds in road guise, 17.6 pounds in TT guise.

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About the Author

Kevin

Rouse may have been a bit late to the bike-riding party, but he’s certainly making up for lost miles. Having discovered cycling while studying journalism at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, he enjoys long days in the saddle whenever—and however—he can get them. You can usually find him on two wheels, but if not, you’d be well served to check the nearest coffee shop.



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